Required during Freshman year: World History or Honors World History AP Track

World History - 1401 

Prerequisite:          None

Grade:  9

Credit:  1.00

World History traces the development of modern civilizations throughout the world from 1400 to the present.  An importance is placed on global viewpoints, social, economic, political and religious movements that have contributed to the creation of the modern world. 

 An overall emphasis is placed on general principles that are applicable to the social sciences, the cause and effect relationships in the human story, the continual development and revision of history, and how our modern world has been shaped and understood.

 

Honors World History AP Track - 1408 

Grade: 9    *Recommended for those who plan to take AP US History, AP World History, or AP European History in the future.                                            

Prerequisite: Invitation by Social Studies Department is required

Credit: 1:00

This course will cover the same topics as the regular freshmen world history course. Students will read additional and more challenging primary and secondary documents, learn to analyze and evaluate evidence, and develop the type of writing skills necessary for success in AP Social Studies courses.

Admission to this class will be based on the following criteria: 8th Grade Terra Nova scores in English and Writing and the St. Francis DeSales Entrance Exam scores in Reading and English.


Required during Sophomore year:  American History or AP US History

 American History  -  1421 

Grade:  10         

Credit:  1.00

 The thematic focus for American History is the period beginning with Reconstruction through the present.  The course puts emphasis on the causes, effects, and events that most affect our country and its role in the world today and the effect of world events on our history.  Students will have the opportunity to examine issues of the twentieth century and speculate on the prospects for the twenty-first century.  The course is designed to offer political, social, and economic insights into our nation’s history and requires several small projects each quarter dealing with various aspects of American history as well as homework, tests, written assignments, participation in class discussions, and oral reports.

The American History course will be taught with an inquiry approach.  Students will be given questions to investigate in both group and individual settings.  Approximately one-third of each quarter grade will be based on research projects; one-third on tests, quizzes, and homework; and one-third on class involvement (including contributions to group work, participation in class discussions, enthusiasm for acquiring historical knowledge, general class participation, cooperation with other students and the teacher.

 

AP United States History - 1420  

Prerequisite: Invitation by the Social Studies Department is required

Grade: 10             

Weighted grade   

Credit: 1.00

This full-year course will cover American History from the pre-Columbian era to the present.  The course will focus on social, political, intellectual, technological and economic developments through this time period.  The class will include traditional learning methods such as lecture, but will also involve more in-depth activities such as the reading, discussion an analysis of primary sources and the evaluation of historians' arguments.  By combining lecture/note taking with source analysis and discussion, students will gain both a knowledge of objective historical information that will lead them to success on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam (taken in May) and critical thinking skills that will help them in all academic areas-particularly as they prepare for college.  Good skills in written analysis and interpretation are essential for success in the class.

 

Required during Senior year: American Government or AP US Govt. and Politics

American Government - 1440 

Prerequisite:  None   

Grade:  12

Credit:  1.00

This full-year course is a study of the government and political process of the United States, including its historical and philosophical development, its organization, and its function today, as well as the Constitutional principles on which it is built.  This course emphasizes the role of citizens in our democracy and the importance of being informed and active citizens, as well as individual rights and responsibilities.

 

AP U.S. Government & Politics – 1437 

Prerequisite: Invitation by the Social Studies Department is required

Grade: 12

Weighted Grade                                                  

Credit: 1.00

This full-year course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  Topics to be covered include the Constitutional underpinnings of our government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of national government: the Congress, the Presidency, the bureaucracy, and the federal courts; public policy, civil rights and civil liberties. Above average critical reading and written analysis interpretation skills are essential for success both in this class and on the AP U.S. Government & Politics exam in May.  Guest speakers and community resources will be utilized when possible.  Additionally, students will prepare for and participate in the Ohio Mock Trial Competition.  Successful completion of this project will require students to meet outside of regular class sessions for trial preparation and scrimmages.

 

Offered during Junior or Senior year: 

Introduction to Psychology - 1434  (.5 year)

Prerequisite:  None   

Elective                                                                 

Grade:  11-12

Credit:  0.50

This semester course is an introduction to Psychology:  the scientific study of the brain and behavior of living things, especially humans.  Students focus on topics including:  research methods, sensation and perception, learning, developmental psychology from infancy to old age, anatomy of the brain, self and personality, abnormal behavior and therapy.  Teaching methodologies will include lecture-discussion, small group work, movies and role-playing.  Students are required to prepare a research assignment on a psychology related issue, theory, or concept.

 

AP Psychology - 1436 (year)

Prerequisite:  Invitation by the Social Studies Dept. and successful completion or enrollment in Advanced Biology

Elective                                                                 

Grade: 12

Weighted Grade

Credit: 1.00

This full-year course is an in-depth approach to Psychology.  The class follows the American Psychological Association’s national standards for the teaching of high school psychology.  The five content areas are: 

1.  Research methods;

2.  Biopsychological (biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception motivation and emotion and stress);

3.  Cognitive (learning, memory, thinking and language, states of consciousness);

4.  Developmental; and

5.  Sociocultural (psychological disorders, and treatment.  Students are required to prepare a research assignment on a psychology related issue.  Emphasis will be placed on developing reading, writing, discussion and critical thinking skills in preparation for the AP Psychology exam in the spring.  It is strongly recommended that students have taken Advanced Biology during their junior year. Students have the option of dual enrollment through Ohio Dominican University.

 

AP World History - 1402

Prerequisite: Invitation by the Social Studies Dept. is required

Grade: 11 or 12   

Weighted Grade                  

Credit: 1:00

The purpose of AP World History is to develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies. This process is advanced through a combination of factual knowledge and development of analytic skills. The course examines: global networks and causes, comparisons of civilization, institutional and technological patterns, geography, human movement and continuity and change from prehistory to the present including contact among societies and human development. Students will use primary and secondary documents, learn to analyze and evaluate evidence, and develop writing skills. AP World History will also have readings/work required for the summer before entering the course. Students are required to take the AP World History exam.

 

AP European History - 1405

Prerequisite: Invitation by the Social Studies Dept. is required.

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. *Seniors: please note that this class does not count toward your Senior Social Studies requirement.

Grade: 11 or 12   

Weighted Grade                  

Credit: 1:00

AP European History will focus on the time period from 1300 to the present. This course will focus on the social, political, religious, intellectual, technological, and economic developments throughout this time period in history. Students will use a wealth of material from textbooks, primary material, visuals, and in-class discussions to become more familiar with the themes of history within this time period. AP European History is a yearlong survey class with goals to develop an understanding of the principal themes in history, skills to analyze historical evidence and an ability to express historical understanding in writing. Summer assignments will be given prior to the school year. Students are required to take the AP European History Exam.


World History 11 -  1401C

Recommended College Prep                            

Prerequisite: None

Grade:  11

Credit:  1.00

World History traces the development of modern civilizations throughout the world from 1400 to the present.  An importance is placed on global viewpoints, social, economic, political and religious movements that have contributed to the creation of the modern world. 

An overall emphasis is placed on general principles that are applicable to the social sciences, the cause and effect relationships in the human story, the continual development and revision of history, and how our modern world has been shaped and understood.

 

Economics - 1435   (.5 year)

Prerequisite:  None    

Elective                                                                 

Grade: 11-12

Credit: 0.50

Economics is for juniors and seniors interested in politics, marketing, business, and the science of economics.  The central concept of the course is the problem of scarcity and how people deal with it.  The course compares different economic systems, discusses basic microeconomic and macroeconomic principles, and examines the economic problems of developing nations.  The course is structured on lectures, open discussion, group projects, guest speakers, and practical exercises.

 

Introduction to Sociology - 1439   (.5 year)

Prerequisite:  None   

Elective                                                                 

Grade: 11-12                                           

Credit: 0.50

Sociology is the study of development, structure, interaction and collective behavior of human beings. This course provides students with an understanding of theories, methods, and approaches to the study of human social and group interactions. It emphasizes the development of sociological thought and the influence of social institutions and cultural factors on human behavior. Among subjects covered are: culture, groups, socialization, deviance and social inequalities. Teaching methodologies will include lecture-discussion, small group work, movies and role-playing. Students are required to prepare a research assignment on a sociological related issue, theory, or concept.

 

Offered During Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Year:

Contemporary Global Issues - 1404

Prerequisite:  None    

Elective                                                                 

Grades 10-12                                          

Credit:  0.50

This semester class will introduce students to a variety of issues facing the world today.  Potential areas of study include global environmental problems, human rights and genocide, the challenge of nuclear weapons, immigration and refugee issues, responding to terrorism, international trade and globalization, and the role of the United States and the United Nations in a changing world.  Since this class deals with contemporary issues these topics are subject to change.  As part of their study of these issues students will be expected to form opinions and evaluate possible solutions to these problems.  Students can expect a variety of instructional approaches including case studies, role playing, small group and class discussion.  Students will also prepare for and participate in a model United Nations simulation.